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The place where the world comes together in honesty and mirth.
Windmills Tilted, Scared Cows Butchered, Lies Skewered on the Lance of Reality ... or something to that effect.


Friday, September 2, 2016

The Daily Drift

Welcome to Today's Edition of  
Carolina Naturally
Cyclones ...! 
 
Carolina Naturally is read in 210 countries around the world daily.   
  
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Today is - Sand Sculpting Day

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Today in History

1666
The Great Fire of London, which devastates the city, begins.
1789
The Treasury Department, headed by Alexander Hamilton, is created in New York City.
1792
Verdun, France, surrenders to the Prussian Army.
1798
The Maltese people revolt against the French occupation, forcing the French troops to take refuge in the citadel of Valletta in Malta.
1870
Napoleon III capitulates to the Prussians at Sedan, France.
1885
In Rock Springs, Wyoming Territory, 28 Chinese laborers are killed and hundreds more chased out of town by striking coal miners.
1898
Sir Herbert Kitchener leads the British to victory over the Mahdists at Omdurman and takes Khartoum.
1910
Alice Stebbins Wells is admitted to the Los Angeles Police Force as the first woman police officer to receive an appointment based on a civil service exam.
1915
Austro-German armies take Grodno, Poland.
1944
Troops of the U.S. First Army enter Belgium.
1945
Japan signs the document of surrender aboard the USS Missouri, ending World War II
1945
Vietnam declares its independence and Nationalist leader Ho Chi Minh proclaims himself its first president.
1956
Tennessee National Guardsmen halt rioters protesting the admission of 12 African-Americans to schools in Clinton.
1963
Alabama Governor George Wallace calls state troopers to Tuskegee High School to prevent integration.
1963
The US gets its first half-hour TV weeknight national news broadcast when CBS Evening News expands from 15 to 30 minutes.
1970
NASA cancels two planned missions to the moon.
1975
Joseph W. Hatcher of Tallahassee, Florida, becomes the state’s first African-American supreme court justice since Reconstruction.
1992
The US and Russia agree to a joint venture to build a space station.
1996
The Philippine government and Muslim rebels sign a pact, formally ending a 26-year long insurgency.
1998
Jean Paul Akayesu, former mayor of a small town in Rwanda, found guilty of nine counts of genocide by the UN’s International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda.

The Origins of an American Icon

Bugs Bunny
Okay, I admit it, all my knowledge of high culture comes from Bugs Bunny cartoons. Some of yours probably does, too. Bugs has been around so long it isn’t easy to find out where he really started, and his influence on generations of fans is phenomenal.
YouTube member kaptainkristian breaks down where this rascally rabbit came from, what he’s done, and why we love him so much. -

While You Wait for Mylan to Drop Its Prices, Here Are Some EpiPen Alternatives for Allergy Problems

100 Percent Bananas?

12 Behind-the-Scenes Secrets of Museums

If all you know about working at a museum comes from Ross on the TV series Friends or the movie Night at the Museum, then you don’t really know what it’s like to work at a museum. Museums vary by what they display: art, historical artifacts, dinosaur bones, etc. and people hold different jobs within an institution. But here are a few secrets they don’t mind letting you know.
2. EXHIBITS CAN TAKE A REALLY, REALLY LONG TIME TO SET UP.

It can take weeks to set up exhibits—and it’s not a regular nine-to-five kind of job. Ivan Campbell, who works as the technical coordinator at the National Geographic Museum, told the Washington Post that one particular exhibit, Indiana Jones and the Adventure of Archeology, came to the museum in 12 tractor-trailers and took workers a solid three weeks of 10-hour shifts to set up. Other exhibits are even more time-consuming—when the National Mississippi River Museum and Aquarium wanted to house an exhibit about the Titanic, the largest show the museum had ever seen, the museum had to completely remodel most of its second floor to make room. All told, it took museum staff more than eight months to prep the museum and set up the exhibit.

6. THEY SOMETIMES HOUSE DANGEROUS ARTIFACTS.

Museums can be home to any number of potentially dangerous artifacts, such as historic weaponry or live crocodiles. But occasionally, artifacts that might not seem particularly dangerous can also be deadly. Take the London Science Museum’s collection of materials used by the 19th-century scientist Sir William Crookes, for example. Crookes was the first person to discover thallium, a poisonous element, and the first to build cathode-ray tubes, which went on to be used in televisions and computers. Crooke also wasn’t particularly neat during his experiments with dangerous elements like thallium and radium—meaning a lot of his equipment is still contaminated with radioactive material.
Read the rest of the secrets of museum employees at mental_floss.

The Pros And Cons Of Procrastination

Procrastination is a really hard habit to break, and for some seems like an inherent trait rather than a habit, but there are pros to being a procrastinator too.
You're generally more relaxed about deadlines, you know the minimum amount of time needed to finish a project, and it all began when you learned how to be a homework ninja and get reports done the day they were due.
So what are the cons? We'll come up with those later... (Barely NSFW due to language)
Cartoonist Dominic Panganiban of Domics created this animated short to illustrate the pros and cons of procrastination, proving that procrastinators can and do actually finish projects!

Map Shows Countries As Named In Their Own Languages

People tend to forget that Japan isn't called Japan in Japanese (it's called Nihon) or that Germany is actually the Budesrepublik Deutschland to the Germans, but these endonyms are an important part of a country's identity.
An endonym is the name for a place, site or location in the language of the people who live there. These names may be officially designated by the local government or they may simply be widely used.
And yet the average map doesn't include these endonyms, so people are left wondering what a suomen tasavalta or rzeczpospolita polska is when they see it written somewhere.
At Endonym Map you can see what all the countries of the world call themselves in their official or national language, on a large, nice looking map which the site is constantly striving to improve:
The vast majority of names come from the United Nations Group of Experts on Geographic Names and the U.N.'s database of country names. Other sources include the CIA World Fact Book, Wikipedia and various government websites.
One big change I am exploring is the inclusion of minority language endonyms in some fashion. I would love to put all three official languages for Belgium on the map, or both Ireland and √Čire for that matter. But with the limited space on a fixed map, there's just not room to do it fairly for all countries. And it bugs me to no end that places like South Africa and India have a dozen or so recognized languages, but there's only room on the map for one. But I am working on it and hopefully will come to a solution soon.
In the meantime, please enjoy the map!

Couple banned from climbing mountains in Nepal for 10 years after faking ascent of Everest

Nepal has imposed a 10-year mountaineering ban on two climbers who claimed to be the first Indian couple to have climbed Everest, officials say. A government investigation concluded on Monday that photographs purporting to show the pair at the top of the world's highest mountain were faked. Officials say the ban is intended to deter other climbers from making spurious and dishonest claims. The pair's claims to have reached the peak in May were queried by climbers.
They argued that photos showing Dinesh and Tarakeshwari Rathod at the summit were obviously doctored. Nepal's tourism department initially certified their ascent but has now rescinded that decision after conducting an investigation. Tourism department chief Sudarshan Prasad Dhakal said that an analysis of photos submitted by Mr and Mrs Rathod revealed they had superimposed themselves and their flag on photos taken by another Indian climber who conquered Everest.
"Despite several attempts to get clarifications from them, they did not co-operate with us during the investigation. The two Sherpas that assisted them are also absconding," Mr Dhakal said. "The ban should serve as a warning for mountaineers to follow ethics." Mr and Mrs Rathod, who work as police constables in the western Indian city of Pune, in July denied the claims, as did the guides who climbed with them.
But a climber based in the southern Indian city of Bangalore, Satyarup Sidhantha, later said that the photographs presented by the Rathods as "proof" of their climb actually belonged to him. Suspicions were further aroused because of the time lag between the day the Rathods claimed to have reached the summit and their news conference announcing their achievement. It was alleged that the couple could not possibly have reached the summit so soon after they were seen to have arrived at the base camp, and that the photos appeared to show them in two different sets of clothes and boots while on the climb.

Supreme Court Won't Reinstate NC Voter ID Law

Supreme Court Won't Reinstate NC Voter ID Law
In a 4-4 tie, the Supreme Court left the appellate court ruling overturning the law standing.

BuzzFeed Exposes Corporate 'Super Courts' That Can Overrule Government

Teacher fired for having sex with pupil had been working in a missionary position

A female teacher fired for having sex with a pupil on his prom night has been working in a missionary position - helping spread the word of Dog among soldiers. French teacher Isabelle Graham, 28, was struck off on Tuesday for having sex with the 17-year-old pupil at a Travelodge hotel in Edinburgh, Scotland. She was declared as being unfit to teach and barred from the profession after a picture emerged showing her lying semi-naked in bed at the hotel while a boy stood at the door of the room.
Now it has emerged that she has been doing work for the Soldiers' and Airmen's Scripture Readers Association (SASRA) a charity based in Aldershot, Hampshire, which spreads the teaching of jesus among soldiers. Devout Christian Ms Graham is known at SASRA, whose patron is The Queen, by the name Shona Wilkie. Shona is her middle name and Wilkie is her married surname. Her husband Andrew Wilkie, 28, who is standing by her, is training to be a clergyman. The pair were engaged to be married at the time she bedded the pupil in June 2014. The couple have subsequently tied the knot and Ms Graham last week gave birth to a baby son. Ms Graham resigned from her role at Whitburn Academy, West Lothian, after the Travelodge sex incident came to light.
She and Andrew, 28, are now living in Aldershot. She has done work in the "donor relations" department of the charity, while Andrew is listed as a support officer at the organisation.Ms Graham started working for SASRA in July 2015. As part of her duties, she compiled a book for the charity of the war diaries of a scripture-reading soldier at the Somme called William Ransley. The book was published in July. Publicity material for the book states: "Shona Wilkie, who compiled this book began working at SASRA in July 2015, coordinating Donor Relations and Book Publications. She and her husband live in Hampshire and are members of a local evangelical cult, where they are both actively involved in cult life."
The charity is a highly respected organization which as well as having The Queen as its patron has former Army chief General Lord Dannatt as president. Its website says: "Our mission is one of personal evangelism. "Uniquely we are permitted, subject to Chaplain's permission and Commanding Officers' permission, to visit soldiers and airmen in their accommodation work and recreation areas. "This is done with a view to befriending them and introducing them to the Lord Jesus Christ." Ms Graham claimed that her drink was spiked on the night of the prom and said she could not remember what happened. But a General Teaching Council for Scotland disciplinary tribunal struck her off after finding that she "repeatedly engaged in sexual activity" with the boy after giving him alcohol and sharing a bed with him.

Indiana Woman Uses RFRA Laws To Justify Beating Her Child

Why Did FBI Run a Child-Porn Site for 2 Weeks and What Does It Mean for the Future of Internet Privacy?

Burglar jailed after his food-themed underwear was used as evidence

A burglar has been jailed after his underwear was held up in court and used as evidence against him. Darren Machon, 39, of Maesteg, Wales, had denied burgling a house in Bridgend in February.
But a witness spotted his "distinctive" boxer shorts after she saw him bent over while rummaging through cupboards, a statement from South Wales Police said. He was jailed for 34 months on Tuesday after a trial at Cardiff Crown Court. Machon was arrested for the burglary while he was in police custody for a separate offense, the police statement said.
As he was getting changed in his cell, an officer noticed his underwear, which had pictures of hot dogs and doughnuts, matched those described by the witness of a burglary earlier that day. Det Con Darren Bowen said: "The witness in this case and also the officer who recognized the underpants also deserve credit.
"It was their vigilance and attention to detail which no doubt ensured that Darren Machon was linked to the burglary. He is a prolific criminal who will spend a number of years behind bars where he belongs - no doubt he'll spend a few of those years thinking about how he should have put his lucky pants on that day." Machon was also convicted of dangerous driving and disqualified from driving for 41 months.

Woman accused of eating frozen garlic bread stolen from resident's freezer

Authorities allege a woman entered a resident’s garage in Winchester, Indiana, and stole garlic bread and a beef heart from a freezer.
City police said when they arrived at the crime scene late on Sunday, they found Danielle L. Cox, 30, of Union City, Ohio, outside the back door of her alleged victim, having consumed a portion of the garlic bread she was accused of stealing.
“She had apparently been eating the garlic bread and was attempting to get into the house when the officer arrived,” according to an affidavit. “The officer observed a frozen beef heart on the ground beside Cox.” The homeowner identified the frozen food as having been in her freezer, and said she did not know Cox.
Cox, meanwhile, told an officer “she knew that she was in Winchester, but believed that she was outside a bar, only a block from the hotel” she said she was staying in. An officer said that Fox became “belligerent” when she realized she was being arrested, and “cried and yelled” while being driven to the Randolph County jail. Prosecutor David Daly’s office on Tuesday charged her with burglary and theft. An initial hearing is set for Thursday in Randolph Circuit Court.

Man allegedly attempted to burn down fuel station after bag of Flamin' Hot Cheetos dispute

A man who was confronted by a gas station clerk for allegedly stealing a bag of Flamin' Hot Cheetos tried to burn down the business on Sunday, police say.
Joshua Lee Crook, 33, was charged on Monday with first-degree attempted arson, a felony, and three misdemeanors. His bail is $20,000, cash only. Just before 5pm, Crook went into the gas station in St. Louis, Missouri, and picked up a bag of the Cheetos.
The store manager, who alleges Crook had stolen from his store before, told Crook to put the bag down if he wasn't going to pay for it. Crook put the Cheetos back and left. About a minute later, he walked back into the store, grabbed the bag again and started walking out of the store.
The manager confronted him; Crook pushed the manager and punched him in the face. Outside, Crook grabbed a gas pump nozzle and threw it on the ground. Gasoline began pooling on the lot, and Crook threw a lit cigarette to the ground. He tried, but failed, to start a fire, authorities say. There was no damage. The misdemeanor charges are for third-degree assault, theft and trespassing.

Gunman wearing just shoes and a bandana stole peanut butter cups from store

Police are hunting for an almost naked man who held up a South Carolina convenience store at gunpoint and escaped with only Reese’s peanut butter cups.
The man walked into a Scotchman store in Myrtle Beach just before midnight last Monday, Horry County Police Department say. An officer responding to a 911 call spoke to a 51-year-old worker who “states a unknown black male came into the store naked with a gun in his hand and stole candy.”
The victim said that the suspect pointed the gun at him “while he was running toward the candy.” The robber stole “Reeses peanut butter cups and left,” reported police, who estimated that the suspect was between 18 and 30 years old The suspect, the employee said, was naked except for a bandana over his face and a pair of black shoes.
The gunman, the witness added, did not say anything or approach him. The responding officer, who was unable to locate the robber, reported that the convenience store “does have video surveillance but it was unavailable at the time of this report.” Before releasing the incident report, officers redacted a description of the handgun as well as the dollar amount of the Reese’s stolen from the store.

Wilderness Expert Coyote Peterson Picks Up A Slug The Size Of A Small Dog

Have you ever seen a picture of someone holding an animal and thought “what the hell kinda critter is that?”
It usually winds up being a cat or a dog or a ferret, or something just as basic, but the big black thing wilderness expert Coyote Peterson is holding in the picture above isn't basic at all.
It's a giant black slug, a giant black sea hare to be exact, and it can weigh up to 30 lbs.
Hunting a sea slug the size of a small dog for his new series "Beyond The Tide" is one thing, but if Coyote starts leash training one of these suckers we'll know he's in need of professional help!

Animal Pictures